February 02, 2009

Seeking College Students With Autoimmune Diseases to Participate in a Survey

Update: We have just learned that the study is now full. We appreciate your interest and will let you know if other studies become available.


If you are a college student diagnosed with a(n) autoimmune related disease(s), then you may be eligible to participate in the Needs Assessment of College Students Diagnosed with Autoimmune Related Diseases study. It's an anonymous online questionnaire (created by researchers at Indiana University Bloomington) asking about your health related academic problems, needs, perceptions, and experiences of living with an autoimmune related disease while attending college.

More than 100 autoimmune related diseases (i.e. lupus, ulcerative colitis, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, juvenile/rheumatoid arthritis, etc.) affect more than 23 million Americans. No data is available on the incidence, prevalence or needs of college students diagnosed with autoimmune related diseases.

To participate in the study, you must be:

  • 18 or older
  • currently enrolled full time or part time in a 4-year institute of higher education, and
  • diagnosed with one or more autoimmune related diseases by your health care provider.
Optional entry to win one of 10 $25 gift cards (5 from Target and 5 from Wal-Mart).

3 comments:

Heidi said...

I would like to participate in the survey, but the link doesn't work, is it still up?

LFA said...

Heidi: We have just learned that the study is now full. We appreciate your interest and will let you know if other studies become available.

the LFA

Robyn said...

My son just dropped out of college in his second semester due to hypothyroidism. Last semester, he survived on energy drinks and Starbucks and managed to make the Dean's list, but it was a struggle. This semester, he just gave up. Blood tests prove his thyroid hormones had dropped, but the doctor refuses to write the note that could validate his need to drop some classes and still save his scholarship for next year. Last semester, the doctor said he was "borderline" but had not done full spectrum testing, but only TSH, which is NEVER enough for my son or myself. It never tells the full truth of our condition.

He's feeling hopeless right now, though improving in microscopic increments since the doctor did raise his meds.

The healthcare and insurance systems in this nation are so messed up. Trying to find the right doctor and actually be covered is a huge dilemma, especially when you're already sick.

Oh! And if he is not in school, he will no longer be under my husband's health insurance. This kid is only 18 years old!